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 Header Item Nursing Home Services (Continued)
 Header Item Report on Public Private Partnerships for Public Sector Infrastructure Projects - Liquidation of the Carillion Group: Motion

Thursday, 4 April 2019

Dáil Éireann Debate
Vol. 981 No. 5

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  4 o’clock

Report on Public Private Partnerships for Public Sector Infrastructure Projects - Liquidation of the Carillion Group: Motion

Deputy John McGuinness: Information on John McGuinness Zoom on John McGuinness I move:

That Dáil Éireann shall consider the Report of the Joint Committee on Finance, Public Expenditure and Reform, and Taoiseach entitled ‘Report on Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) for Public Sector Infrastructure Projects - Liquidation of the Carillion Group’, copies of which were laid before Dáil Éireann on 22nd October, 2018.

As the Minister of State, Deputy D'Arcy, who is present, is aware, the Joint Committee on Finance, Public Expenditure and Reform, and Taoiseach did considerable work on this issue. In my constituency, school building programmes in County Carlow were affected. A significant number of the contractors were based around that area. When the difficulties began and came to light, a number of subcontractors from around the country contacted members of the committee and asked whether it would investigate the matter and try to protect the services and goods the subcontractors had provided to Carillion.

  Before the financial crash, subcontractors were regularly caught out by big contractors such as Carillion and often went broke thereafter. Some of the contractors to which I refer are family-run businesses that have been in existence for generations and provide services or goods. When the public private partnership contract came along, the presumption was that greater guidelines and safety would be built into the contract and would extend to covering the subcontractors in question. I am aware that during the contract phase there were checks on the contractor to ensure that payments were being made and were up to date. When the crash happened, it became clear that the payments were not up to date. Subcontractors providing plastering or painting services, as well as those providing school furniture, for example, were caught and they and their businesses took a substantial hit with a resultant impact on the employment levels in those businesses. I would have thought that since these events occurred and, indeed, since the publication of this report which has 19 recommendations, one of which is that the report and the matters raised therein should be debated in the House, there would have been some progress in informing the committee on the action of the Department or Departments regarding the procurement process in order to safeguard future contracts and subcontractors.


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