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 Header Item Written Answers Nos. 469-488
 Header Item Public Transport Subsidies
 Header Item Driver Licensing Exchange Agreements
 Header Item Coast Guard Services
 Header Item Ports Development
 Header Item Services for People with Disabilities
 Header Item Bus Éireann Staff
 Header Item Driver Test Data
 Header Item Driver Licence Renewals
 Header Item Public Service Vehicles
 Header Item Parking Regulations
 Header Item Bus Services
 Header Item Public Transport
 Header Item Parking Regulations
 Header Item National Transport Authority Data
 Header Item Affordable Childcare Scheme
 Header Item Child and Family Agency Services
 Header Item Children in Care

Tuesday, 5 March 2019

Dáil Éireann Debate
Vol. 980 No. 4

First Page Previous Page Page of 91 Next Page Last Page

Written Answers Nos. 469-488

Public Transport Subsidies

 469. Deputy Catherine Martin Information on Catherine Martin Zoom on Catherine Martin asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross the way in which the subsidy for Dublin Bus is calculated; if it is based on the number of buses advertised that is intended to be run rather than the number of buses that are actually run; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10507/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross The issue raised is a matter for the National Transport Authority (NTA) and I have forwarded the Deputy's question to the NTA for direct reply.  Please advise my private office if you do not receive a response within ten working days.

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Driver Licensing Exchange Agreements

 470. Deputy Robert Troy Information on Robert Troy Zoom on Robert Troy asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross the reason Canadian driver licences are recognised and exchanged here from four Canadian provinces and not from the remaining Canadian provinces and territories; and if this does not reflect the fact that Canadian licences are issued to a national standard despite the province. [10518/19]

 471. Deputy Robert Troy Information on Robert Troy Zoom on Robert Troy asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross his plans to ensure that driving licences issued from the Canadian province of New Brunswick can be exchanged for an Irish driving licence upon arrival here; if his attention has been drawn to the fact that Irish driving licences are fully recognised in New Brunswick and can be swapped immediately for a local licence; and his plans to ensure this anomaly is rectified. [10519/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross I propose to take Questions Nos. 470 and 471 together.

Irish driver licensing law operates within a framework of EU law. In the case of non-EU jurisdictions, Ireland may make bilateral agreements on licence exchange.  This is not a straightforward matter, there is a process to be followed and it does take some time. Canadian licences are issued by the government of the province or territory in which the driver is residing. As a result, specific regulations relating to driving licences varies from province to province, though overall they are quite similar.

Licence exchange agreements can be made only when the relevant authorities in each jurisdiction have studied and compared the two licensing regimes, so that each side can be satisfied that they are compatible. On the Irish side, this task is undertaken by the Road Safety Authority (RSA).

We are currently finalising an exchange agreements with Alberta and Saskatchewan. This will bring to 6 the number of agreements in place with Canada. Work will continue to bring in agreements with the remaining provinces.

Coast Guard Services

 472. Deputy Declan Breathnach Information on Declan Breathnach Zoom on Declan Breathnach asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross if his attention has been drawn to the fact that there are grave concerns among the 950 Irish Coast Guard volunteers resulting from a decision of management of the Irish Coast Guard to stop volunteers using blue lights and sirens while responding to rescue calls; if his attention has been further drawn to the fact that such a measure could result in delays in responding to life and death situations; if he will intervene to examine if this decision can be reversed; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10523/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross There is no change in the policy in relation to use of blue lights and sirens on Coast Guard vehicles. Under SI 694 and 695 of 2011, Coast Guard vehicles can be fitted with blue lights and warning devices. Arising from a safety review internally, the Coast Guard issued a clarification to its volunteers in relation to how these blue lights and warning devices (sirens) should be used on public roads. This instruction sets out the existing position as regards their use while driving on public roads.  The issue of training Coast Guard volunteers and full-time staff in the correct and safe use of Blue Lights and sirens is being addressed as part of the Coast Guard’s Safety and Risk Work Plan.

Any legislative changes in relation to the use of blue lights and sirens would require a policy assessment which would have to take account, inter alia, of the need to balance the safety of staff, whether full-time or voluntary, members of the public as well as those to whom the Coast Guard is responding.

Ports Development

 473. Deputy Catherine Martin Information on Catherine Martin Zoom on Catherine Martin asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross the status of the sale of the Port of Cork property at Custom House Quay, Cork, (details supplied) by the Port of Cork company of which he and the Minister for Finance are the sole shareholders; if transfer of ownership has taken place; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10553/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross Following a detailed review of the  Ringaskiddy re-development funding options the Directors of the Port of Cork Company,  in line with Section 15 of the Harbours Act 1996, decided that the Custom House property located at Custom House Quay in the centre of Cork Docklands, would be advertised on the open market for sale.

One party expressed a keen interest in purchasing the property and the Port of Cork Company Board of Directors agreed to proceed with negotiations. An agreement for the sale of the Custom House was signed on 20 April 2017, subject to a number of conditions including receipt of planning.

The Port Company has a target to vacate the Custom House before 31 July 2020.

Services for People with Disabilities

 474. Deputy Eamon Scanlon Information on Eamon Scanlon Zoom on Eamon Scanlon asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross if provisions will be made for a wheelchair accessible bus on the 480 bus route from Ballyshannon to Sligo; his views on whether having to give 24 to 48 hour notice to book a place on an accessible bus is unfair; if he will implement the 16 recommendations contained in the Accessibility of Public Transport for People with Disabilities report in order to achieve equal access for all; if adequate funding and a clear policy plan will be provided to move towards full accessibility on all public transport; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10569/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross As Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport I have responsibility for policy and overall funding in relation to public transport. However, I am not involved in the day-to- day operations of public transport.

  I have explained to the House previously, that under the Dublin Transport Authority Act 2008, the National Transport Authority (NTA) has statutory responsibility for promoting the development of an integrated, accessible public transport network.

  In light of the NTA's responsibilities in this matter, I have forwarded the Deputy's question to the NTA for direct reply to you.  Please advise my private office if you do not receive a response within ten working days.

  The Report of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Transport, Tourism and Sport, "Accessibility of Public Transport for People with Disabilities", was debated in the House on 21 February 2019. I was pleased to contribute to that Debate and also at the launch of the Committee's Report on 14 November 2018. In addition, I debated with Members of the Joint Committee and other Members of the Oireachtas, on 07 February 2018 as part of the Committee's work in preparing its Report. On each of these occasions, I outlined my policy and provided updates in relation to accessible public transport.

  Accessibility features, such as wheelchair access, are built into all new public transport infrastructure projects and vehicles from the design stage. Looking to the future, investment in public transport will be accelerated under the national development plan, (NDP). In line with recommendations in the Committee's Report, and as with all new and recently developed public transport projects, all these new programmes and projects will be fully accessible as part of the normal design. 

  As part of the Capital Plan Review announced in conjunction with Budget 2018, I secured an allocation of almost €28 million for the Accessibility Retro-fit Programme for the four year period 2018 - 2021.  This represented a trebling of the previous allocation. Of this amount €7 million is allocated for 2019. The Accessibility Retro-fit programme funds an ongoing programme of accessibility improvements to older existing public transport infrastructure and facilities, and it is managed by the NTA. The increase in funding for the retro-fit programme will facilitate the continued roll-out of the programmes to install accessible bus stops, upgrade train stations to make them accessible to wheelchair users and provide grant support for the introduction of more wheelchair accessible vehicles into the taxi fleet.

  Last year I asked the NTA to provide information on (i) the accessibility status of existing public transport infrastructure, (ii) the cost of making public transport services wheelchair accessible and (iii) the accessibility improvements planned with the available funding for the 4 year 2018-2021 under the Retro-fit programme. The information provided by the NTA, and other related information, is available on my Department's website at http://www.dttas.gov.ie/public-transport/english/accessibility. For the assistance of the Deputy, I have outlined in the table the cost figures provided by the NTA, of making public transport services wheelchair accessible.

Bus Stations Buses/Coaches (PSO Services) Bus Stops (PSO coach services) Train Stations Taxis/Hackneys Total
Bus Stations Buses/Coaches (PSO Services) Bus Stops (PSO coach services) Train Stations Taxis/Hackneys Total
€16.35 m €22.5 m €10 m €76 m €214 m €339 m


  I would emphasise that the figures provided by the NTA are estimates, due for example to complexities in relation providing accessible bus stops in rural/regional areas. In addition, the figures relate to Public Service Obligation (PSO) services only, and to Exchequer funding rather than industry costs in the case of Taxi/Hackneys.

  I also advised the House recently that one of my priorities is to complete a review of existing public transport policy as committed to under the Programme for a Partnership Government. This review is a significant and substantial resource commitment and my Department has commenced and substantially completed the research and analysis required to inform the proposed period of public consultation which I expect to launch in the near future.

  I would urge everyone, including members of the Oireachtas, to take the opportunity to contribute to this public consultation and outline their views on all aspects of public transport policy, including in relation to accessible public transport.

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Bus Éireann Staff

 475. Deputy Jonathan O'Brien Information on Jonathan O'Brien Zoom on Jonathan O'Brien asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross if his attention has been drawn to the fact that taxi drivers may not continue contract work with Bus Éireann once they reach 70 years of age despite a continuing demand for drivers; the background to this policy; and if taxi drivers who wish to carry on such contract work can be allowed to do so. [10642/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross The issue raised is a matter for Bus Éireann and I have forwarded the Deputy's question to the company for direct reply.  Please advise my private office if you do not receive a response within ten working days.

Question No. 476 answered with Question No. 468.

Driver Test Data

 477. Deputy John Brady Information on John Brady Zoom on John Brady asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross the number of persons who sat their driver test in County Wicklow in 2018; the percentage pass rate for male and female drivers, respectively; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10652/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross This is a matter for the Road Safety Authority. I have referred the question to the Authority for direct reply. I would ask the Deputy to contact my office if a response is not received within 10 days.

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Driver Licence Renewals

 478. Deputy Gino Kenny Information on Gino Kenny Zoom on Gino Kenny asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross his views on the issue of drivers' licences being renewed and issued before their expiry dates have passed causing applicants to miss out on up to three months of validity if they choose to renew their licences early.  [10658/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross This is a matter for the Road Safety Authority. I have referred the question to the Authority for direct reply. I would ask the Deputy to contact my office if a response is not received within 10 days.

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Public Service Vehicles

 479. Deputy Niamh Smyth Information on Niamh Smyth Zoom on Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross if there are grants available in a scenario (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10663/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross The regulation of the small public service vehicle (SPSV) industry is a matter for the National Transport Authority (NTA) under the provisions of the Taxi Regulation Act 2013.

  The NTA administers two grant schemes for this sector - the Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle (WAV) Grant Scheme and the Electric Small Public Service Vehicle (eSPSV) Grant Scheme.

  Given the role of the Authority in these matters, I have referred your question to the NTA for direct reply to you. Please advise my private office if you do not receive a response within 10 working days.

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Parking Regulations

 480. Deputy Eamon Scanlon Information on Eamon Scanlon Zoom on Eamon Scanlon asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross if a proposal to extend the validity period of disabled parking permits from two years to five years will be supported; if a renewal process akin to that of drivers' licences for persons over 70 years of age will be examined (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter.  [10762/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross The statutory basis for the disabled parking permit is laid out in the Road Traffic (Traffic and Parking) Regulations 1997, as amended, which state that a permit shall be valid for 2 years from its date of issue.

In the early years of the scheme one of the organisations responsible for issuing the permits made a case that permits be issued for a 5-year period to holders of primary medical certificates, a request that was subsequently considered in detail as part of this Department's review of the disabled parking scheme in 2011.  The review ultimately decided that extending the validity period would increase the opportunity for cards that are no longer needed to be used fraudulently, and recommended that that the period be kept at 2 years.

I appreciate that a longer validity period would prove more convenient to the user.  This convenience, however, pales in comparison to the serious challenge posed to the entire disabled parking scheme by the fraudulent use of permits, a growing problem highlighted by the implementation of Operation Enable in 2017.  Disabled parking permit fraud is selfish and illegal and has a considerable negative knock-on effect on legitimate permit holders and on their ability to access everyday services.  In order to combat this scourge and ensure that disabled parking bays are available to those who genuinely need them, it is crucial that every permit be carefully tracked and any unused permit be taken out of circulation. It is for this reason that any extension of the validity period has been ruled out for the time being.

The Deputy's proposal that a separate renewal process be introduced for applicants over the age of 70 is also unworkable as it is not in keeping with the principles of the scheme.  Disabled parking permits are issued strictly on the basis of mobility impairment, not age, and introducing a separate renewal process would risk sending out the wrong message that the permit is an age-related entitlement.

Bus Services

 481. Deputy Catherine Martin Information on Catherine Martin Zoom on Catherine Martin asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross if his attention has been drawn to the ongoing public transport issues in County Limerick particularly with regard to the bus service and its lateness and incorrect real time information both at bus stops and through the app; his plans to tackle the issue; if County Limerick is to receive a BusConnects plan; if so, the timeframe for delivery of same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10800/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross The National Transport Authority (NTA) have statutory responsibility for the implementation and development of public transport infrastructure, including both Real Time Passenger Information and BusConnects.

  Noting their responsibility in relation to this matter, I have forwarded your query to the NTA for their consideration and direct reply.  Please notify my office if you have not received a reply within 10 working days.

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Public Transport

 482. Deputy John Brady Information on John Brady Zoom on John Brady asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross if he has examined the possibility of introducing free public transport; if there are costings on same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10835/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross I have no immediate plans to introduce free public transport for all users, which would require substantial additional funding by the taxpayer or from other sources. 

The National Transport Authority (NTA) has the statutory responsibility for the regulation of fares in relation to public passenger transport services  and also has statutory responsibility for securing the provision of public transport services by way of public transport services contracts in respect of services that are socially necessary but commercially unviable.  The funding of those services comprises both the fares paid by passengers and the subvention payments from the Exchequer.  The main purpose of the subvention payment is to meet the gap between income from fares and the cost of operating services.

In 2017 (the most recently published figures available) passengers paid about €580 million in fares on subsidised bus and rail services.  Therefore, if such services were to be provided free to passengers, then the expected cost to the Exchequer would be in excess of the €580m collected in fares in 2017.  This amount would be additional to the 2019 Exchequer allocation of €287.5m for Public Service Obligation support and the further amount (€95m allocation for 2019) that the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection pays to public transport providers in respect of its Free Travel Scheme, which provides free transport to almost 1 million people in the State, including all people aged over 66 living permanently here, along with some other qualifying people.  So taking round approximate figures, the cost to the taxpayer would be in the region of €600 million per year, in addition to the €400 million that the Exchequer already spends on public transport services.  This is just the cost of the actual services;  it does not count the Exchequer investment in public transport infrastructure which in 2019 is about €350 million and will be rising sharply over the coming years.

The NTA has advised that the estimates of the full year cost of providing free public transport do not factor in the cost of providing the additional fleet, depots, drivers, etc. to meet the likely resultant substantial increase in passenger numbers if fares were reduced or eliminated.

Parking Regulations

 483. Deputy James Browne Information on James Browne Zoom on James Browne asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross if concessions will be offered in cases in which more than one family member requires a disabled parking disc owing to their poor mobility; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [10885/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross As I explained to the Deputy in response to Question 9239/19 of the 26 February 2019, my Department is responsible for the legislative basis for the Disabled Parking Scheme but not for its day-to-day management.  Operational or pricing matters such as this one fall under the remit of the issuing bodies, the Irish Wheelchair Association (IWA) and the Disabled Drivers Association of Ireland (DDAI).

National Transport Authority Data

 484. Deputy Imelda Munster Information on Imelda Munster Zoom on Imelda Munster asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross the capital cost of each category of vehicle purchased by the NTA or bodies funded by the NTA including trains and buses of all types of seat capacity and size; and the cost of all types of electric vehicles in tabular form. [10890/19]

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport (Deputy Shane Ross): Information on Shane Ross Zoom on Shane Ross The National Transport Authority (NTA) have statutory responsibility for the development and implementation of public transport infrastructure including PSO fleet acquisition.

  Noting their responsibility in relation to this matter, I have forwarded your query to the NTA for their consideration and direct reply.  Please notify my office if you have not received a reply within 10 working days. 

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Affordable Childcare Scheme

 485. Deputy Kathleen Funchion Information on Kathleen Funchion Zoom on Kathleen Funchion asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Information on Katherine Zappone Zoom on Katherine Zappone her plans to ensure that community childcare and early years facilities are not left in a disadvantaged position due to the new affordable childcare scheme; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [10710/19]

Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (Deputy Katherine Zappone): Information on Katherine Zappone Zoom on Katherine Zappone Community Childcare settings provide a valuable service to children and families across the country,  including the provision of vital services to vulnerable families in areas of disadvantage.

Over the last four budgets, my Department has increased funding for early learning and care and school age childcare by 117%. A significant proportion of this funding has been targeted at families who use community childcare services, thus assisting with the sustainability issues faced by some services. The Affordable Childcare Scheme will further increase investment in childcare and will reduce the top-up many parents have to pay for their childcare. This will have corresponding benefits especially for community providers. The Affordable Childcare Scheme is also expected to increase demand for services, thereby supporting community services to operate efficiently and at full capacity.

 A core design feature of the Affordable Childcare Scheme is that “money follows the child”. Once a parent has been approved for a subsidy, they should be able to choose any registered childcare provider participating in the scheme, subject to availability, and the subsidy would then be paid directly to that provider. There could be concerns that this could reduce the sustainability of community services by increasing choice of provider. However, the underlying reasons for financial stability problems faced by some community providers does not rest with the nature of the funding model but with a wide range of other factors. Examples of these include the current inability of some parents to pay the level of fees asked of them, the broader range of family supports provided by some services in disadvantaged communities and the particular business models operated by certain services. By creating a clearer, more flexible and more user-friendly scheme, which explicitly links funding to parental income and to the costs of provision, it is intended that the Affordable Childcare Scheme will offer a vehicle for addressing some of these concerns.

For services which are facing financial sustainability, my Department oversees an integrated Case Management system operated by Pobal. This Case Management service provides non-financial assistance or support in the first instance. Financial supports are also available for community services facing certain challenges which may also be accessed through Case Management following a financial assessment.

In addition, my Department is currently undertaking a sustainability review which is examining the financial situation of a range of community childcare services in some of the most disadvantaged areas in Ireland. This review is also taking account of the future introduction of the Affordable Childcare Scheme. The review is expected to be completed in the second quarter of the year and will serve to inform any further sustainability measures or supports which may be required.

Child and Family Agency Services

 486. Deputy Brendan Griffin Information on Brendan Griffin Zoom on Brendan Griffin asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Information on Katherine Zappone Zoom on Katherine Zappone her views on a matter (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [10299/19]

Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (Deputy Katherine Zappone): Information on Katherine Zappone Zoom on Katherine Zappone The Deputy will be aware that it would be inappropriate for me to comment on individual cases.

  I have referred the matter to Tusla, the Child and Family Agency, and asked for confirmation that the case is being dealt with appropriately.

Children in Care

 487. Deputy Clare Daly Information on Clare Daly Zoom on Clare Daly asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Information on Katherine Zappone Zoom on Katherine Zappone the number of children who have been removed from their parent or parents following the family falling into homelessness and in which the fact of the family’s homelessness is the reason for the removal in each of the years 2011 to 2018; and her views on whether paying private companies up to €58,000 per child to place homeless children in foster care is a better use of public money than assisting the family to find accommodation. [10348/19]

 488. Deputy Clare Daly Information on Clare Daly Zoom on Clare Daly asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Information on Katherine Zappone Zoom on Katherine Zappone if a comparative analysis has been performed by Tusla of the rate at which children are removed from homeless families compared with the rate of removal from families that have not fallen into homelessness with a view to establishing whether the housing crisis is causing the break-up of otherwise functional families. [10349/19]

Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (Deputy Katherine Zappone): Information on Katherine Zappone Zoom on Katherine Zappone I propose to take Questions Nos. 487 and 488 together.

Children who are homeless are entitled to have the same level of safeguarding as any other child. Child protection concerns will be dealt with by Tusla with the same degree of diligence, care and promptness for any child in need, regardless of whether they or their family are experiencing homelessness.

Any decision to take a child into care will be based on the child’s need for protection from harm and will take place in accordance with the thresholds set out in the Child Care Act 1991 (as amended). I would like to emphasise, as would Tusla, that homelessness is not a determining factor for children coming into care.

The decision to place a child in a foster care placement with a private fostering agency, as opposed to a foster care placement provided directly by Tusla, is not determined by their housing situation prior to entering care but rather by the imperative to place the child in a foster care placement which best meets his or her needs.

Tusla have informed me that they have not undertaken comparative analysis of the numbers of children being taken into care in circumstances where their families are or are not experiencing homelessness. Tusla information systems collate data under the categories of harm set out in Children First: National Guidance for the Protection and Welfare of Children; that is, neglect, physical abuse, and so on. Tusla does not collect data on the housing situation of children prior to entry into care.

This Government recognises that homelessness is an extremely distressing situation for any family, and living in emergency accommodation is not conducive to normal family life. While ultimate responsibility for managing homelessness rests with the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government, my Department and Tusla are working to provide supports for families in emergency accommodation in order to mitigate the challenges faced by parents and children in this situation.


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