Houses of the Oireachtas

All parliamentary debates are now being published on our new website. The publication of debates on this website will cease in December 2018.

Go to oireachtas.ie

 Header Item Written Answers Nos. 783 - 789
 Header Item Enterprise Ireland Funding
 Header Item Enterprise Ireland Funding
 Header Item Enterprise Ireland Funding
 Header Item Business Regulation
 Header Item Work Permits Eligibility
 Header Item Trade Agreements
 Header Item Departmental Expenditure

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Dáil Éireann Debate
Vol. 946 No. 2

First Page Previous Page Page of 109 Next Page Last Page

Written Answers Nos. 783 - 789

Enterprise Ireland Funding

 783. Deputy David Cullinane Information on David Cullinane Zoom on David Cullinane asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor the number and value of innovation vouchers issued by Enterprise Ireland for each of the years 2006 to 2016, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [18107/17]

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation (Deputy Mary Mitchell O'Connor): Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Research, Development and Innovation (RDI) is globally recognised as the key economic differentiator.  RDI enables companies in Ireland to make products and services that are better, cheaper or more novel than those in global markets.  Thus, in order to export, and to provide insulation from market shocks, such as those posed by Brexit, Irish companies must innovate. 

  Enterprise Ireland’s role in this regard is to support and de-risk such RDI either by supporting companies to (1) do RDI within the company (2) collaborate with Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) or (3) source or licence new technologies from HEIs which can provide a step change in innovative capabilities. These supports all help companies to develop new and improved products and services which serve as the basis for sustainable economic growth.

  As a first step on the innovation ladder companies can avail of €5,000 Innovation Vouchers. Innovation Vouchers are designed to build links between Ireland's public knowledge providers and small businesses and are helping to create a cultural shift in the small business community's approach to innovation. All small enterprises are eligible to apply for an Innovation Voucher.

  A 2013 independent evaluation of the Innovation Voucher Programme carried out for Enterprise Ireland reported that for every €1 invested in this programme, company turnover increased by over €7. As such, the Innovation Vouchers programme is a cost-effective solution to the challenge of encouraging SME businesses to engage in collaborative research with Universities and Institutes of Technology.

  There have been 4,479 vouchers redeemed in the period 2006 – 2016, the value of innovation vouchers across this period is presented below.  In some cases the full value of an innovation voucher will not be drawn down.  

   Enterprise Ireland Innovation Vouchers (approvals €m):

20062007200820092010201120122013201420152016
-0.0181.012.392.582.542.622.572.923.272.89


  Enterprise Ireland Innovation Vouchers (number of vouchers redeemed):
20062007200820092010201120122013201420152016
-4206526524518525527525530594

Enterprise Ireland Funding

 784. Deputy David Cullinane Information on David Cullinane Zoom on David Cullinane asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor the value of innovation partnerships undertaken by Enterprise Ireland for each of the years 2006 to 2016, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [18108/17]

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation (Deputy Mary Mitchell O'Connor): Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Research, Development and Innovation (RDI) is globally recognised as a key economic differentiator.  RDI enables companies in Ireland to make products and services that are better, cheaper or more novel than those in global markets.  Thus, in order to export, and to provide insulation from market shocks, such as those posed by Brexit, companies in Ireland must innovate. 

  Enterprise Ireland’s role in this regard is to support and de-risk such RDI either by supporting companies to (1) do RDI within the company (2) collaborate with Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) or (3) source or licence new technologies from HEIs which can provide a step change in innovative capabilities. These supports all help companies to develop new and improved products and services which serve as the basis for sustainable economic growth.

  It has proved extremely useful for firms to access innovative “know how” and R&D solutions across the HEI sector. However, participating in larger scale collaborative research projects can be both a risky and a costly process.  By providing financial support, Enterprise Ireland can help to reduce both the cost and the risk associated with larger collaborative research projects. Innovation Partnerships offer financial support to companies who engage in collaborative research projects with Irish universities and Institutes of Technology with Enterprise Ireland providing grants of up to 80% towards eligible costs of the research project with a view to developing new products, services and cost efficiencies.  

  A 2014 independent evaluation of the Innovation Partnership Programme carried our for Enterprise Ireland reported that for every €1 invested in this scheme company turnover increased by over €6.69. In addition, for every €1 invested, the evaluation found that €0.50 in investment from industry was leveraged, enabling the programme to be 50% bigger than it would have been if entirely funded by Enterprise Ireland.  The evaluation also found that 95% of companies supported through the Innovation Partnership Programme would recommend the Programme to other businesses.

  There have been 569 Innovation Partnership projects approved in the period 2006-2016. The table below presents the expenditure on innovation partnerships by Enterprise Ireland for each of the years 2006 to 2016.

Year 20062007200820092010201120122013201420152016
€m7.226.747.355.524.196.714.667.8810.528.758.09

Enterprise Ireland Funding

 785. Deputy David Cullinane Information on David Cullinane Zoom on David Cullinane asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor the value of funds issued by Enterprise Ireland under the heading of Horizon 2020 for each of the years 2006 to 2016, inclusive; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [18109/17]

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation (Deputy Mary Mitchell O'Connor): Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Following engagement between my officials and the Deputy's Oireachtas office, the following clarification on the information sought by the Deputy was provided by his office:

  "The deputy is looking for the aggregate of funding secured under Horizon 2020 for each of the years 2014 to 2016 inclusive with the aggregate broken down by higher education institution, and for the aggregate of funding secured under Framework Programme 7 (FP7) for the each of the years 2007-2013 inclusive with the aggregate broken down by higher education institution."   

  The requested data in relation to Framework Programme 7 and Horizon 2020 are provided in Table 1 and Table 2, respectively.

  It should be noted that neither my Department nor its agencies have any role in the awarding or administration of funding. Funding is provided directly to the successful applicant (company, Higher Education Institution and so on) by the European Commission under terms and conditions set out in a bilateral Grant Agreement between the applicant and the European Commission.

  The Tables are derived from data provided by the Commission on an aperiodic basis and in a cumulative manner. Therefore, it is not possible to provide the data in exact alignment with the calendar year.   

  Table 1: Cumulative Funding to HEIs under Framework Programme 7

Table 1: FP7 Funding to HEIs (CUMULATIVE)
 
01.12.2008
02.12.2009
01.12.2010
06.12.201110.09.201211.09.201324.07.2014
TCD
€ 11,559,202
€ 20,216,066
€37,450,793
€51,549,137
€60,728,220
€76,250,460
€84,012,520
UCC
€ 8,643,212
€ 13,616,267
€31,345,498
€43,335,427
€48,764,860
€67,425,054
€71,901,906
UCD
€ 5,771,883
€ 17,397,428
€31,581,783
€45,327,006
€54,338,981
€68,434,113
€82,974,449
NUIG
€ 5,702,716
€ 10,904,095
€25,135,717
€27,395,037
€34,685,784
€38,818,276
€46,317,657
UL
€ 5,266,220
€ 6,972,168
€8,470,117
€11,398,945
€13,438,780
€17,228,129
€20,843,316
DCU
€ 1,837,310
€ 6,302,263
€8,820,819
€14,545,314
€21,976,222
€27,203,195
€31,166,014
NUIM
€ 929,600
€ 974,600
€2,221,872
€4,111,200
€4,464,320
€9,641,008
€9,467,231
RCSI
€ 299,500
€ 4,962,041
€6,639,316
€7,958,852
€8,834,080
€12,258,446
€14,664,885
WIT
€ 4,461,733
€ 4,595,483
€9,035,674
€11,119,036
€11,425,855
€13,293,080
€16,009,133
DIT
€ 563,372
€ 609,703
€1,555,160
€2,476,004
€2,541,942
€2,919,006
€3,225,121
CIT
€ 317,050
€ 381,400
€587,208
€1,251,920
€2,371,144
€2,989,511
€4,462,254
GMIT
€ 246,560
€ 246,560
€246,560
€246,560
€246,560
€246,560
€246,560
NCAD   
€1,333,976
€1,333,976
€1,333,976
€1,333,976
Table 2 - Horizon 2020 funding to HEIs (CUMULATIVE)   
 28.09.201501.11.201631.03.2017
TCD€ 20,333,089€ 54,264,686€63,083,541
NUIG€ 19,556,781€ 35,433,026€36,642,068
UCD€ 18,155,089€ 29,895,915€34,433,986
UCC€ 16,197,348€ 34,863,764€37,787,585
DCU€ 9,556,286€ 15,319,446€16,175,391
NUIM€ 2,525,092€ 3,816,961€ 4,148,431
RCSI€ 2,463,058€ 5,625,629€ 6,165,227
WIT€ 2,010,813€ 2,754,126€ 2,883,176
UL€ 1,970,272€ 5,468,101€ 8,914,025
CIT€ 1,882,674€ 3,986,343€ 4,692,063
DIT€ 529,346€ 2,106,189€ 2,106,189
LIT€ 252,775€ 252,775€ 252,775
AIT € 755,938€ 755,938
DKIT € 1,552,250€ 1,552,250
IT Tralee  € 493,669
DIAS  € 487,226

Business Regulation

 786. Deputy Josepha Madigan Information on Josepha Madigan Zoom on Josepha Madigan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor the regulations in place regarding car washing businesses; and her plans for further regulation and licensing of the industry. [18114/17]

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation (Deputy Mary Mitchell O'Connor): Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor There are no specific regulations applying to car washing businesses for which my Department has responsibility.  These businesses are subject to general consumer protection legislation, including Part IV of the Sale of Goods and Supply of Services Act 1980 on the supply of services; the Consumer Protection Act 2007 on unfair, misleading and aggressive business-to-consumer commercial practices; and the European Communities (Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts) Regulations 1995.  I am not aware of a need for specific regulation for car washing businesses from a consumer perspective. If the Deputy has concerns about these businesses, she should bring them to the attention of the relevant Government Department.

Work Permits Eligibility

 787. Deputy Mick Barry Information on Mick Barry Zoom on Mick Barry asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor if a person (details supplied) can be designated as having the required skills that will enable them to seek work without being dependant on an employer sponsoring them; and the process open to them to pursue this aim. [18201/17]

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation (Deputy Mary Mitchell O'Connor): Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor The employment of all non-EEA nationals in the State is governed by the Employment Permits Acts 2003 – 2014.  Under this legislation, in order to work in the State all non-EEA nationals require a valid employment permit or relevant immigration permission from the Minister for Justice and Equality which allows them to reside and work in the State without the requirement for an Employment Permit. 

  The Employment Permits legislation provides for an actively managed economic migration system that is vacancy-driven and where the offer of a job lies at its core.  All applications for an employment permit are processed in line with the Employment Permits Act 2006, as amended, and any employment permit granted is valid only for the employer and the employment specified therein.

The Irish State’s general policy is to promote the sourcing of labour and skills needs from within the workforce of the State, the European Union and other EEA states.  However, where specific skills prove difficult to source within the EEA, an employment permit may be sought in respect of a non-EEA national who possesses those skills. It should be noted that the State's employment permit system is ordered by the use of lists which determine which employments are highly demanded and which are ineligible for consideration for employment permits at a point in time and these lists are reviewed on an bi-annual basis.  Full information on the current eligibility criteria in relation to employment permits can be found on the Department’s website at https://www.djei.ie/en/What-We-Do/Jobs-Workplace-and-Skills/Employment-Permits/.

  If any non-EEA national is successful in securing a job offer from an employer in Ireland which falls within those employments eligible for an employment permit they may make an appropriate application.

Trade Agreements

 788. Deputy Noel Rock Information on Noel Rock Zoom on Noel Rock asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor if she will consider the passage of new trade laws requiring more stringent food safety checks in order that trade agreements such as the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement, CETA, do not negatively impact consumers here; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [18223/17]

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation (Deputy Mary Mitchell O'Connor): Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor The European Union manages trade relations with countries outside the EU through its trade policy.  This means that it is the EU not individual member states that negotiate international trade agreements.  The European Commission acts as chief negotiator on behalf of the whole EU, but does so in close cooperation with the Council and European Parliament who ultimately approve any final agreement.

The EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) was adopted by Council of the European Union and signed by Canada, the EU and its Member States at the EU-Canada Summit on 30 October.  On 15 February 2017, the European Parliament voted in favour of the provisional application of CETA.  Provisional application is a standard part of trade agreements and allows those parts of the agreement for which the EU has competence to come into force.  Provisional application allows businesses and consumers to enjoy the benefits and new opportunities of the agreement as soon as possible.

CETA is a new generation agreement that will remove over 99% of tariffs between the EU and Canada and will create sizeable new market access opportunities in services and investment.  It will end limitations in access to public contracts, open-up services market, and offer predictable conditions for investors. 

The agreement covers virtually every aspect of economic activity, and it is extremely important for Ireland.  It offers significant opportunities for growth in trade for with Canada.  The agreement opens up public procurement markets in the Canadian provinces giving Irish firms increased access to Canadian public sector purchasing.  Ireland also gains unlimited tariff free access for most of our important food exports.  CETA provides significant opportunities for the Irish dairy industry and has strong protections for our beef industry through restricted quotas for Canadian beef entering the EU. 

CETA will not affect EU rules on food safety or the environment.  This has also been made clear in the Joint Interpretative Instrument agreed by both Parties.  As now, Canadian products will only be able to be imported to and sold in the EU if they fully respect EU regulations. 

On 22 April 2015 the European Commission tabled internal EU legislative proposals which allow Member States to restrict or prohibit the use of GMOs in human or animal food.  Under EU rules, GMOs that have been approved for use as food, for animal feed or for sowing as crops, can already be sold in the EU.  Applications for approval are assessed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and then sent to EU Member States for their opinion.  So far, 70 GMOs have been authorised.  The safety assessment which EFSA carries out before any GMO is placed on the market will not change as a result of CETA. 

EU Food Safety Laws, like those relating to hormones used in animal production will not be affected by CETA, if Canadian beef has been treated with hormones, it will continue to be prohibited for sale in the EU.  CETA will not restrict either the EU or Canada from passing new laws in areas of public interest such as the environment, and health and safety.

I fully support provisional application of the Agreement.  Opening markets has the potential to keep prices down and give consumers more choice.  My Department is already working with our agencies and Business Groups to ensure that Irish firms take early advantage of the terms of the Agreement.  I will be leading a trade mission to Canada in late May to promote the opportunities provided by the Agreement.

Departmental Expenditure

 789. Deputy John Deasy Information on John Deasy Zoom on John Deasy asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor the amount spent across her Department over the past five years on maintaining vacant or unused State-owned properties, including security arrangements; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [18728/17]

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation (Deputy Mary Mitchell O'Connor): Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor Accommodation for my Department is provided by the Office of Public Works (OPW) in buildings which are either State-owned or leased by the OPW on our behalf. Therefore, my Department does not directly own or control any properties.

  No building assigned to my Department by the OPW is unoccupied.

  My Department has not incurred costs regarding security arrangements on maintaining vacant or unused State owned properties.


Last Updated: 03/03/2020 14:00:23 First Page Previous Page Page of 109 Next Page Last Page