Snippet data - viewing only, no editing possible


Label

Field name

Field value


Sitting_Date

02/14/2018 12:00:00 AM


Sitting_Forum


Snippet Ref No

SnippetRefNo

EEE00100

Selected Quill

SnippetType

14

Saved Quill

SnippetType_C4D


Selected Quill

SnippetType_1

14

Speaker Name

IndxSpeakerName


Business Category

IndxMainHeadCat

Bills

Sub Category

IndxSubTopic

Employment (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill 2017

Topic

IndxQHeadTopic

Second Stage

See Also

SeeAlso


Part1

TitlePart1


Part2

TitlePart2


Part3

TitlePart3


Volume

VolumeNo

965

Book No

BookNo

5

Pdf Ref

PdfPageRef


Default Business Index

IndexViewCategoryDefault


3 Part Title Business Index

IndexViewCategoryTitle


Default Topic Index

IndexViewCategoryDefaultSpeaker

Employment (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill 2017\Second Stage
Bills\Employment (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill 2017\Second Stage

3 Part Topic Index

IndexViewCategoryTitleSpeaker


Motion Code

MotionCode


Motion Title

MotionTitle


Stage

MotionStage


Amendment No

MotionAmendmentNo


Bill Code

BillCode

B2

Bill Title

BillTitle

Employment (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill 2017

Stage

BillStage

Second Stage

Section

BillSection


Statement Code

StatementCode


Statement Title

StatementTitle


Stage

StatementStage


Hour Indicator

HourIndicator

Not applicable

Procedural Instruction

Procedural_Instruction

No

Debate Adjourned

DebateAdjourned

No

Question Askee

QAskee


Question Asker

QAsker


Question Department

QDept


Question ID

QID


Question Reference

QRef


Question Speaker PID

QSpeakerPID


Question Speaker PID To

QSpeakerPIDTo


Questions Asked

QUESTIONSASKED


Speaker Type

SpeakerType


Speaker Name

Senator


Deputy


Minister


Witness


Chairman


ViceChairman


ActingChairmanD


ActingChairmanS


Speaker4Display

Speaker4Display


Speaker

Speaker


SpeakerPID

SpeakerPID


SpeakerText

SpeakerText


OriginalUnidSnippet

OriginalUnidSnippet

04DF9399743E74AC802582340075C24C

LastModifiedSnippet

LastModifiedSnippet

11/16/2018 04:22:47 PM

TopicIndex1stCategoryValues

TopicIndex1stCategoryValues

Snippet Contents:

The ICTU report found that across the country, there are currently 163,000 workers facing conditions of zero-hour contracts or so-called if-and-when contracts; this is what is dressed up as the gig economy. They cannot tell from week to week what hours they will work, if they definitely will have work and what contracts and conditions they will face. The industries most commonly associated with this are sales, tourism and the services industries. It is also evident in areas that previously were better regulated and paid areas of the economy such as public administration, health and education. These are areas in which the Government is a key driver of the casualisation of labour.
A total of 61% of all workers in full-time or part-time temporary contracts are between 15 and 34 years of age. The same way landlords tell us young people do not really want to own a home and would rather share a two-bedroom apartment with eight other professionals, IBEC and big business would like to say that these millennials, of which I am one, do not want permanent jobs but flexibility. Richie Boucher, who previously received an income of close to €1 million a year from Bank of Ireland, was the latest person to tell us that millennials "don't have the same desire for long-term security". It is easy for him to say. Of course people want long-term security, decent working conditions and stability in their lives. The reality is that 70,000 workers on temporary contracts are temporary against their will. Of course they want better working conditions and wages.
The effects have been outlined and are widespread. It means that people cannot have work-life balance and cannot plan from week to week. It means they cannot get mortgages. The effect on mental health is absolutely devastating. TASC published a report in 2017 where one of the respondents in the study had stated: This is the result not of work itself, which is fulfilling and gives people meaning in their lives, but the levels of flexibility and exploitation to which young workers are subjected in precarious employment.
The answer is to do what happened in America with the 15 Now movement and what happened in Britain with the organisation of McDonald's workers. We need in Ireland to rebuild a movement of young workers - the so-called precariat - to turn the tide and challenge the exploitation. This means organising the unorganised in trade unions and the left in the Dáil pushing to outlaw precarity.