Snippet data - viewing only, no editing possible


Label

Field name

Field value


Sitting_Date

10/10/2017 12:00:00 AM


Sitting_Forum


Snippet Ref No

SnippetRefNo

KK00200

Selected Quill

SnippetType

1

Saved Quill

SnippetType_C4D


Selected Quill

SnippetType_1

1

Speaker Name

IndxSpeakerName

Daly, Clare

Business Category

IndxMainHeadCat

Financial Resolutions 2018

Sub Category

IndxSubTopic

Budget Statement 2018

Topic

IndxQHeadTopic


See Also

SeeAlso


Part1

TitlePart1


Part2

TitlePart2


Part3

TitlePart3


Volume

VolumeNo

960

Book No

BookNo

1

Pdf Ref

PdfPageRef

76

Default Business Index

IndexViewCategoryDefault

Financial Resolutions 2018\Budget Statement 2018

3 Part Title Business Index

IndexViewCategoryTitle


Default Topic Index

IndexViewCategoryDefaultSpeaker

Budget Statement 2018

3 Part Topic Index

IndexViewCategoryTitleSpeaker


Motion Code

MotionCode


Motion Title

MotionTitle


Stage

MotionStage


Amendment No

MotionAmendmentNo


Bill Code

BillCode


Bill Title

BillTitle


Stage

BillStage


Section

BillSection


Statement Code

StatementCode


Statement Title

StatementTitle


Stage

StatementStage


Hour Indicator

HourIndicator

Not applicable

Procedural Instruction

Procedural_Instruction

No

Debate Adjourned

DebateAdjourned

No

Question Askee

QAskee


Question Asker

QAsker


Question Department

QDept


Question ID

QID


Question Reference

QRef


Question Speaker PID

QSpeakerPID


Question Speaker PID To

QSpeakerPIDTo


Questions Asked

QUESTIONSASKED


Speaker Type

SpeakerType

1

Speaker Name

Senator


Deputy


Minister


Witness


Chairman


ViceChairman


ActingChairmanD


ActingChairmanS


Speaker4Display

Speaker4Display

Deputy Clare Daly

Speaker

Speaker

Deputy Clare Daly

SpeakerPID

SpeakerPID

ClareDaly

SpeakerText

SpeakerText

Clare Daly

OriginalUnidSnippet

OriginalUnidSnippet

E33142A81A38F2F4802581B50067572A

LastModifiedSnippet

LastModifiedSnippet

02/11/2020 03:47:26 PM

TopicIndex1stCategoryValues

TopicIndex1stCategoryValues

Snippet Contents:

My expectations for the budget were not great and I spent most of the afternoon semi-bored and disillusioned at the usual mantra. Having listened, however, to Deputy Wallace and his forensic annihilation of what the Government calls a housing strategy, I consider that it should be compulsory listening for every Minister. I challenge every Minister to come back to Deputy Wallace and answer the points he made. This country is on a hiding to nothing in the area of housing when citizens spend the overwhelming majority of their income, if they have one, to try to keep a roof over their heads and older citizens find their houses full again with adult children and grandchildren as families try desperately to save a few bob to buy a house. Others are ending up in hotel rooms and the like. It is an absolute scandal. Deputy Wallace was also correct and in no way flippant when he noted that the nation's spirits will have been lifted far more by last night's victory in soccer than by anything in this budget. When did a budget ever transform the lives of people? It is fine for the Taoiseach to stand up and say this will not be a bonanza and that we will be responsible and careful. It is good for him that he has the luxury to be careful because being careful means defending a status quo which represents a life of severe challenge for huge numbers of our citizens.
The Government may say it is great for spending €1.2 billion but that must be looked at in the context of the last three budgets which cut the tax base by €2.6 billion. As such, the Government has not even got back to where it started to cut. Nothing in this budget will address the fundamental problems in the State which are caused by the fact that we tax less and spend less than practically every other European country. We are completely out of kilter in that regard. Unless we address that, the problems faced by people will continue to occur. The Government must ask itself whether it thinks people will really be going out tonight saying it is great that they have an extra fiver. The first thing they will say is that it is not actually a fiver but is in fact €2.50 over the course of a whole year. However, that does not sound as good. Therefore, the Government decided to call it a fiver and start the payments more than halfway into the year. It is sickening. Even if it were a fiver, which it is not, €2.50 is not going to put a roof over someone's head and give them access to healthcare or a decent education. Sadly, we have missed that opportunity in this budget.
Next year marks the 100th anniversary of the election of Countess Markievicz, the second female Cabinet Minister anywhere in the world. We had a Proclamation in this State which issued a call to Irish men and Irish women yet Irish women are being left behind again in this budget. That is why I want to look from the viewpoint of a number of women and young girls in my constituency. They are not exceptional and I am sure their stories are echoed and repeated in every corner of the country. Let us talk about Zoe who is ten years of age and has a rare genetic disorder, PKU, which means her body is unable to break down certain amino acids. The only treatment for PKU is Kuvan, a drug which could vastly improve her quality of life and prevent her from potentially suffering brain damage. This drug is sanctioned and available in most European countries. In Ireland, it is not. Let us talk about her mother, Karen, who has spent years fighting a daily battle and having to tell the story of the struggle she endures to ensure her daughter has the same quality of life as other children. Let us talk about Maria, a woman in my area who has split from her partner. She is a part-time worker who looks after her son. Her former partner does not pay maintenance but she has religiously kept up the payments relating to her half of the mortgage. As she cannot pay the whole thing, however, the bank is moving against her.
Let us talk about Claire, whose mother-in-law is 58 years of age and is suffering from Alzheimer's disease. Because she is under 65 years of age, there is nothing by way of support for the family. Her husband gets three hours of help a week. She is unable to wash or dress herself and has lost her ability to focus. She cannot see people or things in front of her or read or write and she gets lost in her own house. Nevertheless, her family gets three hours help per week. Home is the best place for that woman but her family needs support to keep her there. As her daughter-in-law says, it is heartbreaking to watch a strong, independent and glamorous lady become vacant and lost. They grieve every day for the person she once was while knowing that every day she gets further away from them. How many other families are in that position while we sit within these comfortable walls?
Let us talk about Mary. She began her working life in 1966 but had to give up her job because of the marriage bar. She raised three children and went back to work at 49. At 65 years of age, she went to claim her pension but because she had worked as a younger woman, she found her PRSI stamps would be calculated over 47 years. That meant she would only get a third of her contributory pension.